IND vs NZ: The Kiwis have the worst record of 32 years .. All out for the lowest score by an Indian bowler in the Mumbai Test ..! | India vs new zealand 2nd test new zealand team all out for 62 runs in mumbai test ravichandran ashwin mohammed siraj axar patel jayant yadav shines

India Vs New Zealand, 2nd Test: The record for lowest Test score in India is currently held by New Zealand. India took a huge lead in the first innings of the Mumbai Test.

IND vs NZ: The Kiwis have the worst record of 32 years .. All out for the lowest score by an Indian bowler in the Mumbai Test ..!

India Vs New Zealand, 2nd Test: World No. 1 Test team New Zealand erupted as Indian bowlers wreaked havoc at Mumbai’s Wankhede ground (India Vs New Zealand, 2nd Test). India were all out for 325 in the first innings. New Zealand collapsed to just 62 in the first innings. New Zealand holds the record for lowest Test score in India. India were all out for 75 against the West Indies in the 1987 Delhi Test. This is the lowest Test score on Indian soil.

The Indian bowlers bowled superbly in Mumbai. Mohammad Siraj points to New Zealand’s top 3 batsmen. In Siraj bowling, Tom Latham, Will Young and Ross Taylor took key wickets. After this, the spin trio of R Ashwin, Jayant Yadav and Akshar Patel completed the rest of the work. In bowling, Ashwin took 4 wickets for just 8 runs. Akshar Patel 2, Jayant Yadav took one wicket.

Ejaz Patel excels with left arm spin bowling. Wankhede all out TeamIndia for 325 in the first innings at the ground. This made him the third bowler to take ten wickets in a single innings in Test cricket. Anil Kumble later set a new record as the only bowler to achieve this feat.

Jim Laker of England took 10 wickets in the 1956 match against Australia. Jim Laker became the first player to take 10 wickets in an innings in a Test match. He set the record in the 1956 Ashes series.

Anil Kumble became the second Indian bowler to take 10 wickets in a single innings. Kumble set the record in the second Test against Pakistan in Delhi from 4 to 8 February 1999.

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